Targeting the young

Well, football season has ended. Finally. We who enjoy watching skilled athletes perform in person and on television now can turn our attention to more important matters.

Television and sports executives spend obscene amounts of money to persuade the rest of us of the importance and excitement promised by the Big Game, which rarely if ever lives up to expectations generated by the hype. Yesterday’s certainly was a dud.

If you want your team to win a football game, it‘s a good idea to have an offense that functions, you know, one that manages to achieve a few first downs and even score some points. Just saying. Neither team brought much of that to this game.

Many folks say that they watch the Super Bowl for its commercials. These imaginative ads cost their sponsors lots of dollars, and some of them do entertain. We can be grateful that something associated with this event does, which brings me to the much-heralded halftime show. Which entertainers gets chosen to perform during this extra-long break in the game is a Big Deal, and for me, this raises a question.

What is the median age of television viewers who annually watch the Super Bowl? If we were to speculate on this based on the half-time entertainment, those in charge of choosing these performers believe that most of us are in the 18-to-30 age range. I question this, and my own age tempts me to believe that beyond this Super Bowl halftime show, most of the decisions that drive what we call popular culture are based on this assumption. Awards programs for music, television programs, and movies demonstrate this emphatically.

Our so-called popular culture narrowly targets and worships those in this youthful age range. I wonder if this is paying off. Are these people responding with their dollars, loyalties and life choices? Maybe.

Someone could be overlooking the rest of us. Is this a big mistake?

I think so, but then, I’m older than 30. I think I’ll turn off the game, open a good book and listen to the classical music station. Care to join me?

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